February 2000 Archives

Michael Udris

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Michael Udris is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Modern Culture and Media department at Brown University. Michael Udris and his brother David Udris are the principal designers and owners of Udris Film. They produce feature documentaries and commercial projects. Their work has screened internationally at film festivals, in museums, and on television. They collaborated with James Der Derian on the documentaries Human Terrain and and After 9/11. After 9/11 aired on Link TV and is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt, Germany. Their work has also appeared in publications from Rolling Stone and Art in America to the Washington Post. They are joined by a team of designers and production personnel from diverse backgrounds, including film and broadcast production, web, and multimedia design.

David Udris

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Davis Udris works at Brown University in the Modern Culture and Media department as the Media Facilities Manager. David Udris and his brother Michael Udris are the principal designers and owners of Udris Film. They produce feature documentaries and commercial projects. Their work has screened internationally at film festivals, in museums, and on television. They collaborated with James Der Derian on the documentaries Human Terrain and and After 9/11. After 9/11 aired on Link TV and is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt, Germany. Their work has also appeared in publications from Rolling Stone and Art in America to the Washington Post. They are joined by a team of designers and production personnel from diverse backgrounds, including film and broadcast production, web, and multimedia design.

John Phillip Santos

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John Phillip Santos is a visiting fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies. At the Institute, he works with Global Security Program Director James Der Derian on the Global Media Project. Santos is an author and media producer, most recently as a Berlin Prize Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, where he worked on The Farthest Home is in an Empire of Fire (Viking/Penquin, 2005) and the development of Teletopia Labs, a production workshop for documentary media performances. Before that, he held various positions in media, including stints as a producer at CBS and PBS.

Santos received his BA in philosophy and literature from the University of Notre Dame and his MA in English literature and language as a Rhodes Scholar at St. Catherine's College, Oxford University. He is the author of Places Left Unfinished at the Time of Creation, published by Viking/Penquin in 1999, which was a National Book Award finalist in nonfiction. Santos also was an Emmy nominee in 1988 for "From the AIDS Experience: Part I, Our Spirits to Heal/ Part II, Our Humanity to Heal," and in 1985 for "Exiles Who Never Leave Home."

Catherine Lutz

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Catherine Lutz is the Thomas J. Watson, Jr. Family Professor of Anthropology and International Studies at Brown University and holds a joint appointment with the Department of Anthropology, which she chairs. Her specialties include military, war, and society; Automobility and inequality; Race and gender; Democracy; Subjectivity and power; Photography and cultural history; Critical theory; Anthropological methods; Sociocultural contexts of science and technology; U.S. twentieth century history and ethnography; Asia-Pacific.

Professor Lutz received her BA in sociology and anthropology from Swarthmore College and her PhD in social anthropology from Harvard University.  Her most recent books include Carjacked: The Culture of the Automobile and its Effects on Our Lives (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), The Bases of Empire: The Global Struggle against US Military Posts (New York University Press, 2009), Local Democracy under Siege: Activism, Public Interests, and Private Politics (New York University Press, 2007, winner of a Society for the Anthropology of North America book award), and Homefront: A Military City and the American 20th Century (Beacon Press, 2001, winner of the Leeds Prize and the Victor Turner Prize). Others include Reading National Geographic (Chicago, 1993) with Jane Collins, and Unnatural Emotions: Everyday Sentiments on a Micronesian Atoll and their Challenge to Western Theory (Chicago, 1988). She is past president of the American Ethnological Society, the largest organization of cultural anthropologists in the U.S.

Keith Brown

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Keith Brown is a sociocultural anthropologist specializing in the study of twentieth-century Macedonia, the evaluation of democracy promotion programs; identity politics in diasporic communities; and what the US military learned about culture from its experience in Bosnia and Kosovo.

He received his doctorate from the University of Chicago and taught at Bowdoin College and the University of Wales before joining the Watson Institute. He also spent 1999-2000 as a senior fellow at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, DC, and 2005-6 as a visiting fellow at the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute.

His research into how different communities construct history in Macedonia, Greece, and Bulgaria led to his book The Past in Question: Modern Macedonia and the Uncertainties of Nation, as well as a number of articles on the culture, history, and politics of Macedonia. He is also the editor of Transacting Transition: The Micropolitics of Democracy Assistance in the Former Yugoslavia, which came out of ongoing research on the politics of US democracy promotion programs. His other projects focus on identity politics in diasporic communities, and how the U.S. military thinks about culture. He is a co-founder and director of research on the Cultural Awareness and the Military Project at the Watson Institute for International Relations at Brown University

Gianpaolo Baiocchi

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Gianpaolo Baiocchi is associate professor (research) of international studies at the Watson Institute for International Studies and associate professor at Brown University's Department of Sociology. He is also director of the Development Studies Program at Brown.

He is an ethnographer interested in questions of politics and culture, critical social theory, and cities. He researches actually existing civil societies and participatory democracy, with a special interest in Brazil. He also writes on critical social theory, especially within the "relational" tradition, and on race relations. He is engaged in several collaborative projects, including the engaged work of promoting participatory democracy in the US. They include:

  • The Changing Nature of Public Space
  • Interrogating Civil Society: An Inter-American Consortium
  • The Participatory Budgeting Project
  • Beyond Good Governance
  • The Paradoxes of Participation: Social Movements and Political Institutions in recent Brazil
  • The Right to the City - Associational Activity and Urban Space in Sao Paulo

Baiocchi's monograph, Militants and Citizens: The Politics of Participatory Democracy in Porto Alegre (2005: Stanford University Press) was an ethnography of popular participation in this Brazilian city, and a forthcoming book, Making Spaces for Civil Society (co-authored with Watson Institute Faculty Fellow Patrick Heller and Marcelo K. Silva) examines participatory arrangements in several pairs of cities in Brazil. His most recent research has been about the travel and translation of participatory blueprints and ideas in the current era.

Prior to joining Brown, Baiocchi was associate professor of sociology and associate director for research and core faculty at the Center for Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is also editor of States and Societies: The Newsletter of the Political Sociology Section of the ASA and associate editor of Social Science History. He received his PhD and MS in sociology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and his BA from the University of California, Berkeley.

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